Purchase your tickets online

8th Annual LCLAA Cesar Chavez Dinner & Dance

Please download Sponsorship and Tickets PDF here

Saturday, March 28th, 2015
5pm – Midnight

Live remote radio show starting at 5pm

The Police Protective Association Event Center
Right off 1-25at 2105 Decatur Street,
Denver, CO 80211

$50.00 per person

Contact Us

Solomon FJ Juarez
President
P.O. Box 39817
Denver, Colorado 80239
E-mail: sjuarez@denver.co.lclaa.org
720-205-1880

Eloy Garduno
Vice President
E-mail: eloygarduno@denver.co.lclaa.org
(720) 345-4974

Brynn McKenna
Secretary/Treasurer
E-mail: bmckenna@denver.co.lclaa.org
303-437-4498

About Us

Once social change begins, it cannot be reversed. You cannot uneducate the person who has learned to read. You cannot humiliate the person who feels pride. You cannot oppress the people who are not afraid anymore. We have seen the future, and the future is ours.”

LCLAA’s roots
The 1950’s brought many Latino activists to the forefront of the civil rights movement. These trade unionists struggled to open the doors of opportunity for Latinos and they fundamentally believed that through the labor movement & the electoral process, Latinos would be able to strive for social dignity, economic equality, access to the political process and a higher quality of life for every Latino working family.

These ideals became part of the “American Dream” and with this dream in mind, Latino trade unionists from throughout the U.S. and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico convened and made a commitment to promote the social, economic and political progress of the Latino community, founding in 1972 the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA)- an organization that would devote itself to making the American dream a reality for all working people by working collaboratively to empower Latino within the unions and help strengthen the labor movement by educating Latino and immigrant workers about the role of unionization in achieving just and safe workplaces.

Since its inception in 1972, LCLAA has remained a grassroots organization driven and directed by Latino labor leaders who understand the importance of unionization to help workers secure rights and protections on the job and empower them to become voices for justice and change in their communities. . Our commitment to the growth and progress of the https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/ labor movement and the Latino community, combined with the relentless work ethic of our chapters and leaders has helped LCLAA play a major role in the historic elections of Latinos at all levels of government. From local city mayors, to Federal Congressional positions, Latinos are now better represented in the political life of this country because LCLAA has made it its mission to transmit the assets of the Latino community, the labor movement, government and beyond.

Our growth is attributed to the courageous and devoted men and women that sought a better future for working families, ascended through the union ranks and used their leverage to help Latino workers nationwide assert their right to leadership and representation.

LCLAA has remained on firm ground- bringing unity where there was division and providing a voice to fight the injustice that prevailed in our community’s silence. We continue the fight for quality jobs with living wages and the right to organize in the workplace without the fear of retribution. We are committed to achieving immigration reform because without it we are failing to advance the rights of all workers and we will embrace victories but will remain vigilant because challenges will continue to arise but as always, we will be ready to confront them.

LCLAA’s work has ranged from marching for union recognition in our workplaces to advocating in Congress for a range of issues that affect working families. It has rallied for health care reform, immigration reform, workers’ rights for all, and quality jobs that protect our workers and our environment. Through these fights, it has encountered tremendous resistance but it has always looked after the well-being of the Latino community, holding no regard for the size of the battles ahead.